Where to buy standing rib roast? Recipes appreciated as well.

It’s a little far ahead, but my sister and I were talking about Christmas dinner and I brought up the idea of possibly making prime rib.

Now the supermarkets around me don’t really sell a big rack like they serve at nice prime rib restaurants, where can I go to buy a whole rack? Also, how much are we talking about for 7 (which I think is the most?) ribs?

Also, have any of you prepared it before? What are some things we should know, tips, etc.

Thanks!
bone in prime rib? its good for presentation but its a lot easier to make a boneless prime rib imho (which has a different name, beef ribeye. same cut but without the bone). try your local meat markets for that kind of specialty cut. even the supermarkets might have it if you inquire at the meat departments. and if they dont have it, they can get it.

as for price your probably looking at around 10 bucks a pound, a full rack being probably around 100 bucks ive never done a full prime rib rack.

as for recipes. i use this one.
allow roast to stand to room temp. cover in grey poupon. rock salt and black pepper the outside, along with some thyme and rosemary to taste. add garlic powder, and onion powder if you like. cover the whole outside in smoked applewood bacon using toothpicks to secure it to roast. cover in foil and roast in preheated 300 degree oven until ready. usually 30-45 minutes a pound is what i do.

then remove and serve.

its pretty good, might not be your taste but i like it. i use the bacon as a side garnish or toss them into a side salad

bone in prime rib? its good for presentation but its a lot easier to make a boneless prime rib imho (which has a different name, beef ribeye. same cut but without the bone). try your local meat markets for that kind of specialty cut. even the supermarkets might have it if you inquire at the meat departments. and if they dont have it, they can get it.

as for price your probably looking at around 10 bucks a pound, a full rack being probably around 100 bucks ive never done a full prime rib rack.

as for recipes. i use this one.
allow roast to stand to room temp. cover in grey poupon. rock salt and black pepper the outside, along with some thyme and rosemary to taste. add garlic powder, and onion powder if you like. cover the whole outside in smoked applewood bacon using toothpicks to secure it to roast. cover in foil and roast in preheated 300 degree oven until ready. usually 30-45 minutes a pound is what i do.

then remove and serve.

its pretty good, might not be your taste but i like it. i use the bacon as a side garnish or toss them into a side salad

sounds pretty good to me. 10 bucks per pound doesn’t seem too steep, if it’s a for a special occasion , i wouldn’t mind forking over the money
I did prime rib last Christmas… I have a friend who’s head chef in a local club… he got me a full rib roast, bone on, for just under $100. He also threw in 2 pounds of the largest shrimps I have ever seen in my life. If you don’t know anyone working in the restaurant business, look through the Yellow Pages for a restaurant supply distributor… often they will have a retail outlet.
When all else fails, find a butcher shop.

It was more way more than was needed, so we cut a piece that would fit in the roaster, and shoved the rest in the freezer. In the bottom of the roaster, I poured in twos can of beef broth, and one can of beef consomme. Outside of the meat was lubed up with canola oil, then coated with season salt, cracked black pepper, fresh thyme, and dried parsley. Make sure the meat is at room temperature when you begin!! Very important, because ice cold meat will not react the same when placed in the hot oven.
A meat thermometer was inserted into the center of the roast, and set to 125F. The roaster was set to it’s highest setting, when temp was reached The roast was placed in the roaster, with the rib bones serving as a rack, to hold the meat up out of liquids on the bottom. The temp was then reduced down to 325F. When 125F was reached on the thermometer (about 3.5 hours, as I recall) the meat was pulled from the roaster, and allowed to rest, meanwhile the roaster and it’s juices are still on. After the meat has rested (at least 20 min), any cuts desired well done, should be cut first, and set back into the hot au jus to finish. Cuts closer to the ends will be more done, than the center which shouldn’t get above medium rare. If you end up with a roast on the bone, just use your longest knife to gently cut the roast off of the rack first, before you begin slicing.
Careful temperature control, and plenty of hot au jus are the keys to a good Prime Rib dinner!