Thinking about all-clad but…

Most of my frying pans and Saute pans are non-stick. I don’t like to cook with tons of olive oil and butter. With this be a huge problem if I switch to all-clad stainless? Does pam do the trick in stainless steel?

no, you will never recreate the "non stick" with something like pam, each pan has their own purpose.

You can. Use Grape Seed Oil. Much better for you than Olive Oil, although depending on what you’re cooking will require just that much oil. I don’t use a lot of oil myself when cooking but when it needs oil, it needs oil.

And I don’t understand how Olive Oil isn’t low fat …
Sticking is not a problem with All-Clad. Get their MC2 series. Not even risotto sticks to my saute pan.
mmmm all-clad

just keep it well seasoned and use something like grapeseed oil

you can reuse oil if it’s something that you commonly cook/same exterior
I save bacon grease in a jar in the fridge for when I want to cook without non-stick pans.
I just rub a small amount of butter on the pan. Instant non-stick and I used what, maybe 1/8 inch of butter to lube up a 10 inch saute? Not shabby and I can’t imagine getting that much taste out of that low fat!
You need at least 1 non-stick pan for when you want to get a nice crust on something. This is impossible in a non-stick.
cast iron ftw. yeah, they are a bear to work with between the weight and the whole seasoning/breaking in process, but a well seasoned cast iron pan is awesome sauce.

at the same time, you prolly want some stainless pans for cooking acidic foods like tomatoes as well as at least 1 slick, non-stick pan (as Alton Brown once said, non-stick != slick and slick != non-stick though a pan can be non-stick and slick… or something like that) for eggs and such.
If you have a thrift store where you are you can usually find really good deals on cast iron pots and pans, they are good if you have any kind of iron deficiency because acidic foods will leach some of the iron out in to the food.

As fare as for caring for them the biggest thing you don’t want to do is put them in a dish washer or let them soak in water for a long time since this will destroy any seasoning the pan may have.

You can. Use Grape Seed Oil. Much better for you than Olive Oil, although depending on what you’re cooking will require just that much oil. I don’t use a lot of oil myself when cooking but when it needs oil, it needs oil.

And I don’t understand how Olive Oil isn’t low fat …

Olive oil is ALL FAT. It’s just a very light, low-energy fat. Just like every oil that’s liquid at room temperature.

Anyway, cooking with oil is better than cooking with teflon. The extra oil will make you feel fuller and takes longer to digest than simpler carbs, so you won’t get hungry as fast, and you’ll eat less overall.

I don’t buy that grapeseed oil is better for you than olive oil; the only difference is that grapeseed oil is almost always extra-virgin, because there’s much less demand for it and there’s no reason to press the grapeseeds more than once — or to drain each press into a separate container. It’s first-press oil that has all the vitamins and whatnot, not the type of oil; each type of oil has useful vitamins if you get the first press.

If you have a thrift store where you are you can usually find really good deals on cast iron pots and pans, they are good if you have any kind of iron deficiency because acidic foods will leach some of the iron out in to the food.

As fare as for caring for them the biggest thing you don’t want to do is put them in a dish washer or let them soak in water for a long time since this will destroy any seasoning the pan may have.

It’s worth noting that this is the reason pewter cookware and tableware should be avoided at all costs: the same acid that leaches iron out of steel pots will leach lead out of pewter pots, and my guess is you’re already happy with your current level of stupidity.

yes yes I am thank you very much, that’s why I stick with cast iron, I know what went into it, and there are not any chemicals that will make me retarded. I’ve also got into casting my own pots and pans from cast iron since I’ve become involved with my school’s foundry.

cast iron ftw. yeah, they are a bear to work with between the weight and the whole seasoning/breaking in process, but a well seasoned cast iron pan is awesome sauce.

at the same time, you prolly want some stainless pans for cooking acidic foods like tomatoes as well as at least 1 slick, non-stick pan (as Alton Brown once said, non-stick != slick and slick != non-stick though a pan can be non-stick and slick… or something like that) for eggs and such.

I had mine to the point where I could cook eggs in it w/o problems… I need to start using it again and build the seasoning up.
What’s hard about seasoning iron? Just rub canola oil on it once a week.
It’s not just the oil, but also cooking the oil, as well as all the things you’ve cooked in the pan before. If all you do is oil it, all you’ve got is oiled metal, not seasoned iron. I prefer handed down cast iron, as it’s more seasoned than you’ll ever get it in your lifetime.

It’s monounsaturated.

.

I stripped down my castiron pan recently to remove some strange carbon accumulation that was flaking off of the outside, and even after 10-15 sessions of trying to get it seasoned, stuff still sticks that never would have even tried to before I stripped it.
At work, we’ve got five cast iron pans- BIG ones. Big enough that they almost cover 2 burners on a 6-burner Imperial range. Over the probably 20 years that three shifts have been using them, they have become as seasoned as any handed down pans I’ve seen. I make scrambled and fried eggs in them with no problems.