Power sources for disposer and dishwasher??

Yeah, I’m thinking of adding a garbage disposal and a dishwasher to this pole barn. Silly question… What powers these 2 things? I know the disposal uses a standard switch, but does it have a plug in somewhere?? I know the dishwasher needs a water in and a water discharge, but what powers it? Are they 110, 220, or something else? Don’t worry, I’m not actually doing the work; a contractor will be. I’m just seeing what needs to be set up.
I think dishwasher models vary so you’ll want to check out the model washer you are getting to be sure. Disposers are usually 110 but some of the bigger commercial models may use 220.

Some disposals are furnished with a cord and plug for installation, but the majority are hardwired. As noted, unless you’re purchasing something exotic, both the disposal and dishwasher will use a 120V single phase 20A circuit.
Someone may correct me if I’m wrong.

The power for the disposal could be tied into an already existing circuit if one is available.

The dishwasher should be on it’s own separate circuit.

All of the ones I have had have been 120Vac.
I hope you have easy access from the kitchen to the panel. Most older houses have the panel underneath which is smart but most newer homes have it quite far away. You are going to have to run a separate feed from the appliance to the panel. This can get really expensive depending on the distance not because of the wire length so much as the time it will take to run it through the wall.

Not sure on the garburator but here we put it in on it’s separate line. YOu might be able to junction another one though.
I’m still in the framing stage, so it’ll be all good to run the wires through the studs. I’m SURE my electrician will know, but I wanted to make sure everything was good. Do you normally run a DW and a disposer on a GFI or not? I know you do not want the fridge on a GFI circuit.

Also, anyone know if there is an issue running coax, cat5e, and possible speaker wire in the same bundle? I know you only run romex in its track for safety and interference issues, but could I run my surround, coax, and data strands in a single bundle.? And how big can I make a hole in a vertical 2×4 for running any cables? I’ll go 1" for the homewire, but all the others may be bigger than 1" if they’re all run in one bundle. Just trying to educate myself so I won’t sound like a tool when I meet with the electrical guy. He said I can supply all the materials and drill my own holes in the I joists and studs if I want to save money. That’s damn cool right there; he’ll even supply a materials list.

Someone may correct me if I’m wrong.

The power for the disposal could be tied into an already existing circuit if one is available.

The dishwasher should be on it’s own separate circuit.

All of the ones I have had have been 120Vac.

To get specific, let’s look at the 2005 NEC.

Could the disposal be tied into an existing circuit? Yes and no. If the disposal is furnished with a cord and plug attachment by the manufacturer, that means it is UL listed for installation in such fashion. This is important because the two 20A small appliance branch circuits required for 1 and 2 family dwellings per Article 210.11(C)(1) have their use qualified under 210.23 which deals with permissible loads. 210.23(A) has an exception which reads:

The small appliance branch circuits, laundry branch circuits, and bathroom branch circuits required in dwelling unit(s) by 210.11(C)(1), (C)(2), and (C)(3) shall supply only the receptacle outlets specified in that section.

So, that would indicate that if the disposal plugs into a receptacle with a cord and plug, it’s compliant, right? No. Under 210.52(B), dwelling unit receptacle outlets, more specifically small appliance outlets come under further definition, and this part 210.52(B)(1) is important:

the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets…

Therefore, a disposal being attached to the underside of a sink is most likely going to be situated within a cabinet, and therefore cannot be connected to either a wall or floor outlet, as no mention of receptacle outlets within cabinets exists. Further, 210.52(B)(2) states: The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no other outlets. So, the idea of adding an outlet within the cabinet to feed the disposal is prohibited.

In conclusion, tying the disposal into an existing circuit, either via a receptacle outlet or direct wiring is only permissible if it is not one of the dedicated small appliance branch circuits.

The statement that a dishwasher should be on its own separate circuit depends on the appliance. A 20A 120V circuit is good for 2400W, and if we are conservative and rate the maximum continuous load of the circuit at 80%, that brings the figure down to 1920W. Older, less efficient dishwashers were probably good candidates for a dedicated supply with no other loads. However, modern energy efficient units are sometimes furnished with cord and plug connections, the cord being 16/3, which is rated to carry 13A under table 400.5(A) in the B+ column, as only two conductors are current carrying.

Check the ampacity/wattage rating of the dishwasher, add that to the ampacity/wattage rating of the disposal, and if you are less than or equal to
1920W (amps x volts), you are safe feeding both appliances with a single 20A branch.

Sorry for the length of this post, but sometimes multiple references and explanations are required to cover all salient points.

I’m still in the framing stage, so it’ll be all good to run the wires through the studs. I’m SURE my electrician will know, but I wanted to make sure everything was good. Do you normally run a DW and a disposer on a GFI or not? I know you do not want the fridge on a GFI circuit.

Also, anyone know if there is an issue running coax, cat5e, and possible speaker wire in the same bundle? I know you only run romex in its track for safety and interference issues, but could I run my surround, coax, and data strands in a single bundle.? And how big can I make a hole in a vertical 2×4 for running any cables? I’ll go 1" for the homewire, but all the others may be bigger than 1" if they’re all run in one bundle. Just trying to educate myself so I won’t sound like a tool when I meet with the electrical guy. He said I can supply all the materials and drill my own holes in the I joists and studs if I want to save money. That’s damn cool right there; he’ll even supply a materials list.

Let’s first look at your GFCI question. The 2005 NEC lists required locations for 1 and 2 family dwellings in Article 210.8. Nothing in that article requires GFCI protection for a dishwasher or garbage disposal. Note that if a disposal is cord and plug connected to a receptacle within a cabinet, and the receptacle is duplex style and located close to the front inside edge of the cabinet, such that it is likely to be used for other purposes, I would install a GFCI receptacle in that location, purely to err on the side of safety.

Refrigerator on a GFCI isn’t clearly a no. Most refrigerator receptacles are located behind the appliance, and as such meet the "not readily accessible" rule. However, I have seen refrigerators plugged into receptacles which were located in such position as to make them fall under 210.8(A)(6) which includes kitchens, where the receptacles are installed to serve the countertop appliances, and as such would require GFCI protection.

Bundling all of your low voltage data cabling shouldn’t be a problem, but I’d read the technical documents on what you’re planning to connect, incase there are advisories or prohibitions.

Holes in bearing wall framing, per either IRC 602.6 or UBC 2320.11.9 are limited to 40% of the member depth. Translated, a 2 x 4, which is finished @ 3 3/8" (3.375"), has a maximum permissible through bore of 1.35", just under 1 3/8", but do not allow the through bore to have its edge closer than 5/8" to the interior plane, per the above IRC section, and UBC 2320.11.10.

You’ve used the key word when it comes to handling your power wiring, and that is "bundling". When branch feeder cables are closely spaced, they may lose their ability to freely liberate heat caused by current flow, and this can lead to insulation breakdown, and fire.

The factors to be considered include the AWG of conductors, the insulation temperature rating (60°C or 90°C), how many conductors are being bundled, and for what linear distance. This number of variables precludes my offering an intelligent answer, so I would advise contacting the Authority Having Jurisdiction, or AHJ and asking them what they will permit. Some aspects of code are subject to the interpretation of the inspector, so it’s better to find out what they will accept before beginning work.
Thanks a bunch Kazoo! I’m thinking more of running the speaker wire separately from the cat5 and coax. I’m running three cat5 lines to each jack. Yes, three cat5 lines! My buddy who works at Verizon and does this stuff all day for a living said people underbuild ALL THE TIME. Million dollar mansions and they think "We’ll add jacks later to save $50 per run while it’s being framed." Well, he has to tell them they will now have staples, buried phone lines, cable under siding, and a hole drilled through their new crib. With all that’s on a phone line these days (data, voice, satellite, etc), he said if you ever want two phone lines and all the the other goodies (future expansion), run 3 cat5 cables and make the odd colored one for the phone line. He told me it’s impossible to troubleshoot some situations these days because all the wires in the gray phone line are used up, so he has to run a new line in those cases too. Point being, if I run all that cat5 (or cat6) there will never be any troubleshooting or expansion issues. Plus, the cat5 is twisted in a strand as to not casue interference/crosstalk like a simple gray phone line can.

Heat is a concern and he told me to keep all runs under 300′, which will be no problem. I figure I’ll mount the speaker wire in the highest hole, the cat5 in the middle hole, and the electrical romex in the lower hole to avoid any interference issues. Trust me, I will not go cheap on the material! The electrician told me he normally does a 15% markup on parts (and others do 100% and use cheap stuff), but he would tell me what to get and it will be right. I think I’m all set thanks to this forum, my buddy at Verizon, and the electrician. It’s cool when an independent 35 year experienced electrician and his partner say "We’ll run anything anywhere you want and within code, but tell us about the phone and speaker stuff because we generally don’t do that. We will run it, but find out where to terminate and how you want it done…" That’s old school!