Need help stocking a kitchen (Cutlery,Cookware, etc)

I will be moving into a new place soon and I want to get some nice kitchenware. I want to buy quality stuff that I will only need to buy ONCE. I am thinking that I atleast need:

Knife set w/ Steak knives – What is good?
Pot/pan set – What metals? Nonstick?
Quality cutting board – Wood or Plastic?
Blender – Cuisinart?
Mixer – Kitchenaid (artisan or pro?)
Kitchen Tools (shears, and other utensils)
Baking Tools (trays and such) – silicone stuff?

Mixing bowls

and

Plates/bowls/dishes
Silverware
Coffee machine
Toaster

Anything I’m forgetting? What should I expect to spend for all this? Brand reccomendations would be great as would suggestions on what to avoid and how to pick the right items.
Good link but I’m more curious as to brands, materials, and what justifies the costs of certain items.

I will be moving into a new place soon and I want to get some nice kitchenware. I want to buy quality stuff that I will only need to buy ONCE. I am thinking that I atleast need:

Knife set w/ Steak knives – What is good?
Pot/pan set – What metals? Nonstick?
Quality cutting board – Wood or Plastic?
Blender – Cuisinart?
Mixer – Kitchenaid (artisan or pro?)
Kitchen Tools (shears, and other utensils)
Baking Tools (trays and such) – silicone stuff?
Mixing bowls

and

Plates/bowls/dishes
Silverware
Coffee machine
Toaster

Anything I’m forgetting? What should I expect to spend for all this? Brand reccomendations would be great as would suggestions on what to avoid and how to pick the right items.

since i hand-picked all of my stuff from SCRATCH, for utility and quality, ill tell you what I HAVE – which is effectively everything that one NEEDS:
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1. messermeister meridian elite 8" chefs knife – 100$
this is solingen-made quality steel; the kitchen workhorse
2. forschner 8" chefs knife w/ wood handle – 30$
this is THE value kitchen knife. very sharp.
the reason i have 2 chefs knife is (a) 1 for meat 1 for vegetables (b) guests can use it [nobody touches my messermeister]
3. messermeister meridian elite 4" paring knife – 10$(?)
i actually dont use it much… but everyone needs a paring knife for small work. i bought messermeister to match my chef’s knife…but you can get forschner
4. forschner 12" serrated bread knife – 20$(?)
nothing else can cut bread
5. forschner 4" lime knife w/ dual-pronged end – 5$
random use knife. neat end for stabbing a lime and dropping in a cocktail
6. messermeister honing steel – 20$
use this to keep your knife edges straight. a hone is NOT a sharpener. honing is regular maintenance. leave knife sharpening to a pro
7. get knife SLEEVES to protect your knives, or a magnetic strip. big wooden blocks are dumb. (i have messermeister sleeves.. but looking for mag strip)

dont buy a gay henckels/wustoff SET like everyone else. most of that shit is superfluous. buy a-la-carte only what you need. no, you dont need steak knives
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7. BAMBOO cutting board – 20$
you want a large surface… nothing more annoying than having shit spill over. i *just* got a great 20$ board from costco that is bamboo in base, but has 8 poly inserts which you overlay the bamboo as actual cutting surface. this way, you wont need to buy multiple boards for a big job.

8. salt & pepper & general grinder – 3×20$
fresh ground stuff > *. use for rock salt, whole peppercorns, and any spice should you need spice
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9. 10" gourmet standard SS-AL-SS cladded saute pan w/ lid – 80$
cladded SS > thick SS > thick alum > anodized alum > * > shitty thin pans > any teflon nonstick bullshit
i have no need for curved "frying" pan when i have saute pan. straight tall sides holds liquid for braising if needed. 12" takes too much space on stove. 8" not enough room for food.

10. 12" lodge cast-iron griddle/frying pan – 20$
this has been winning favor away from my saute pan.
pros: durable as fuck. holds shitload of heat (meats go here). non-stick as motherfucker (eggs go here; fuck you teflon!)
cons: heavy. need little more care. reactive to acidic food (tomatoes, wine) — hence have SS saute pan for such uses

11. calphalon 3-qt SS/AL/SS saucier/chef’s pan w/ lid – 50$
its like a sauce pan, but curved sides, so whisks can hit everything. decently wide, decently tall; it does everything – hence "chefs pan". cooks single serving rice, pasta, boils veggies, etc, and obviously reduces sauces.

12. 5qt enameled cast-iron dutch oven/"casserole" – 50-150$
cast-iron holds lots of heat. enameling allows it to work with acidic food, so this is perfect for pasta sauces, soups, stews, etc. you’ll always see one on a cooking show. if you’re a baller buy a le creuset or staub. i bought martha stewart brand on sale for 50$ and it still looks good and works extremely well

13. Analon 12-gal stainless steel cladded stockpot – 50$
ideally, you’ll get fully cladded pot, but most pots are only cladded at the base, which is really all you need. you can get tramontina, cuisinart chefs classic, calphalon, etc… its just a big pot (preferably with thick material) for boiling crabs, lobsters, crawfish, making big soup, stock, etc
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14. silicone oven mitts. silicone mats/trivets (which doubles as can opener). silicone handles high heat, and stays cleaner

15. lots of them. the standard looking steel ones… dont get fancy here.

16. wooden/bamboo cooking utensils. plastic = melts. metal = scrapes and fucks up your shit. silicone = for homos. just get a buncha paddle looking things

17. nice high quality kitchen shears. im not sure what brand mine are, but i use them for everything.

18. thick LARGE SS roasting pan w/ roast rack

19. mesh splash guards – in case you fry/saute/etc a lot of stuff

20. some fine sieves

21. a few colander bowls for veggies, pasta, etc

22. few rectangular clear bake dishes

23. few large cookie trays/sheets

24. buncha large SS bowls, and small SS bowls. i keep my prepped food items in here before cooking them.

above are the *needs*

you dont need a mixer. i never use a blender or processor (though ive got them). stick with brands like cuisinart or kitchenaid. you dont need machines with 73 speed settings. get ones built sturdily, with on/off switches and a pulse switch. thats all you need. no need for toaster if youve got toasting oven.
Check out a restaurant supply store.
I prefer F. Dick knives as utility/prep knives.
Cheap, fast, and strong.
This is just the stuff that I have, and I love to cook and cook very often. The vast majority of my stuff I make sure I can put in the dishwasher. My nice knives don’t go in, wooden things don’t go in, and my old castiron pan doesn’t go in either.

Knife set w/ Steak knives – I love my Wusthof Classic series knives, I have 1 9" chef’s knife and a 3.5" paring knife, then a cheapo off brand bread knife and a hand-me-down fillet knife. I’d probably get a few cheapo paring knives to throw in the dishwasher, I have about 4. I bought a Wusthof block to keep them in and I’m very happy with it.

Pot/pan set – I have no idea, I still have lots of hand-me-downs, but you definitely need a good nonstick, and a good castiron. If you can find a used one, it’ll probably be better(better seasoning) but a new Lodge one or similar would be fine.

Quality cutting board – I have about 5 plastic cutting boards. They’re easy because I can just throw them in the dishwasher, and they’re cheap. Other than not looking as nice as wood, I don’t really see a downside. I have one that I only use for raw meats too, and I can tell it apart because of the color.
Blender – A Vitamix would be the ultimate, and they’re truly worth the money if you ever do any kind of blending. Both my father and my boyfriend’s parents have one, I have a cuisinart hand-me-down from the 70’s.

Mixer – Kitchenaid is decent quality. I’m perfectly happy with my Artisan mixer, and I use it fairly regularly. If you’re going to be using it every weeks for something, maybe go with the pro, but realistically, you should be fine.

Kitchen Tools -You can get shears with your knife set, just make sure they separate into 2 pieces for easy cleaning. You’ll want a few silicone spatulas(they might be "gay" but they handle heat well, don’t scratch stuff, nothing sticks to them, and they can be tossed in the dishwasher), at least one smooth wooden spoon, a ladle or something to serve soupy stuff with, at least 1 whisk(I really adore my flat whisk and it takes up less room than a balloon whisk), I have a few pairs of tongs that I use for grilling/turning meat and stuff, a good meat thermometer, a candy thermometer, veggie peeler, I use my cheese slicer/shaver a lot, a microplane box grater(epic), a small microplane zester for zesting and shaving parmesan, measuring cups(i have a cheap plastic set, and 2 and 4 cup pyrex ones), you’ll want a Pyrex bowl set, super cheap on Amazon, and a pastry brush or 2(1 for sweet, 1 for savory), an offset spatula or 2 are handy for frosting things, I have a huge one and a tiny one. You’ll want at least 2 colanders, 1 big one for pasta, and one wire/mesh one for straining things like seeds out of things and chicken stock, etc. I have 2, one finer than the other. That’s all I can think of off the top of my head.

Baking Tools – I much prefer regular old materials to silicone, after having both a silicone loaf pan, and silicone cupcake tray, I gave both of them away. Metal ones seem to work so much better. I would get professional sized aluminum baking sheets(with edges) and a silpat or 2 if you ever do any baking. These are worth their weight in gold. I use my 3 baking sheets and silpats for baking and flash freezing. You’ll want at least 1 9×13" baking pan, I prefer pyrex, as well as loaf pan(s), I have 2 8" cake rounds, and a 9" (leak resistant) springform pan.

and

Plates/bowls/dishes – I got mine at cb2.com and I’m impressed with their quality. I got 8 dinner plates, 8 bowls, and 8 salad/dessert plates for less than $100 on sale, and they’re hefty and gorgeous.

Silverware- Get nice SS silverware. I made the mistake of getting Target silverware when I moved out and after a couple years it started rusting and generally looking unpleasant.

Coffee machine – unless you drink a whole "pitcher" of coffee every day, you’d probably be better off getting a french Press. They take up less space and make better coffee. You’ll also want at least a cheap coffee grinder.

Toaster – Get a toaster oven. I wish I had bought one instead of my pretty red toaster. I have no idea who makes nice ones.

How about a microwave?
Great stuff!! Gives me lots to think about. I am definitely looking into some good cast iron cookware after hearing everyone on here praise it especially after its well seasoned.
Oh and realistically how much should I expect to spend? I figure I can buy this stuff over time but I am thinking under 2k for everything would give me enough money to get stuff that will last.
I’d start pricing out the expensive stuff, most of it you can live without for a while. I tend to buy things as I need them. I personally only make cupcakes once every 2-3 years, so if I didn’t have a cupcake pan, I wouldn’t miss it.

One more thing you probably want to get is a good dutch oven. Think about the average size of a roast, and get one a little bigger than that. I asked my boyfriend for a castiron dutch oven for christmas, expecting a ceramic-coated Le Creuset of some sort. I ended up with an ENORMOUS non-coated castiron camping one. It’s huge, but it holds heat very well an I could cook something pretty huge in there.

When seasoning your castiron pan, you’ll want to keep it coated with a little oil at all times. After a weak moment of wanting to remove carbon deposits from the outside, I ended up ruining the seasoning, so I’m in the process of reseasoning the damn thing. I just keep it coated in a little oil and in the oven. That way whenever I’m baking, preheating or whatever, it’s getting some seasoning. I felt sick to my stomach the first time I tried to cook with it after removing the seasoning, and the pork chop I was searing stuck. So there’s your warning, keep the outside clean, and if it gets chunky, don’t pick at it too much!

I’d start pricing out the expensive stuff, most of it you can live without for a while. I tend to buy things as I need them. I personally only make cupcakes once every 2-3 years, so if I didn’t have a cupcake pan, I wouldn’t miss it.

One more thing you probably want to get is a good dutch oven. Think about the average size of a roast, and get one a little bigger than that. I asked my boyfriend for a castiron dutch oven for christmas, expecting a ceramic-coated Le Creuset of some sort. I ended up with an ENORMOUS non-coated castiron camping one. It’s huge, but it holds heat very well an I could cook something pretty huge in there.

When seasoning your castiron pan, you’ll want to keep it coated with a little oil at all times. After a weak moment of wanting to remove carbon deposits from the outside, I ended up ruining the seasoning, so I’m in the process of reseasoning the damn thing. I just keep it coated in a little oil and in the oven. That way whenever I’m baking, preheating or whatever, it’s getting some seasoning. I felt sick to my stomach the first time I tried to cook with it after removing the seasoning, and the pork chop I was searing stuck. So there’s your warning, keep the outside clean, and if it gets chunky, don’t pick at it too much!

An enameled dutch oven is pretty high up on my list of things to buy once I move into my new place. Are the higher end brands like le creuset or staub really worth the extra cost? Who makes good quality cast iron cookware?

And on the topic of seasoning and cleaning cast iron. Do you clean the inside also or will that strip away the "seasoning" I’m new to this so bear with me!
You clean it carefully. If I didn’t cook anything with strong flavor(cornbread, german pancakes, etc) I just wipe it out with a dry paper towel, if it seared steak or something in it, it gets a quick scrapedown with warm water, and then I swish some diluted soapy water in to break up excess grease. That’s probably not the right way to do it though.

I have no idea about brands, but you can get Le Creuset stuff at Marshall’s occasionally for a lot less than most kitchen stores.

Betty crocker SS set. Cheap, medium thickness, better than any nonstick. But it’s not idiot proof. You can’t use it to deep fry and it’s difficult to clean.

We also have two sets of Calphalons here. The dishwasher’s pot scrubber setting has slightly ruined a couple of them.

As for silicone, while I love my small spatula, the turner is a pain to use. I think I prefer wood.

Flatware

Not the prettiest, but cheap and strong.

I didn’t pick out our dinnerware (it’s some lame china) but I like this

Or a whole set of wood/bamboo, or sushi style dinnerware.

You need a pizza stone too. Square rather than round. And a bamboo steamer for fun.

For coffee, a french press is the best.

If you get a toaster oven, get a convection one.

Last but not least, a big wok.
silicone spatula and stuff too flexy. wood > silicone
forgot 2 items: silicone BASTING brush – very useful – 5$ and microplane zester (AWESOME) – 15$

i gave you prices for everything
Cast iron is the greatest!! I inherited all my grandmother’s iron.

The proper way to clean cast iron is to first rinse with water to remove the majority of gunk. Then for the stubborn stuff, use vegetable oil and salt to scrub the surface with a paper towel. Rinse well, and re-oil. Soap is a huge no-no.
Plastic srubbies work well too.

A slow cooker is the working person’s best friend! Hamilton Beach make a really nice 3 in 1 slow cooker for under $50

Buy cheap nonstick pans and replace them frequently. The surfaces all break down, and if you’re not heavily invested, you’re more likely to get rid of them before you start ingesting the stuff. I only use them for eggs, anyway.

silicone spatula and stuff too flexy. wood > silicone
forgot 2 items: silicone BASTING brush – very useful – 5$ and microplane zester (AWESOME) – 15$

i gave you prices for everything

I absolutely HATE my silicone basting brushes. I’ve tried 2 different models because I keep wanting to fall in love with them but they just don’t work well. The "fibers" are too big, too slick, and too far apart to hold any amount of liquid unless it’s a very thick sauce that you’re basting with. Regular old cheap plastic basting brushes work much better and you can throw them out when they start getting weird from heat.
an enameled pot/ "dutch oven" acts like a slow cooker but you can control the heat more finely

why throw away 4 cheap thin uneven nonstick pans at 60$ when you can buy a good one at 60$. do eggs on seasoned cast iron
getting cast iron seasoned well enough to do eggs takes time. I like having cheap teflon pans that I can put in the dishwasher and not worry about damaging.

Perhaps, but you’re not going to leave your oven on all day while you’re at work, are you? Also, a slow cooker is the very best way to make homemade spaghetti sauce… if you do it right, you can allow your gravy to cook all day without stirring, or worrying about it scorching on the bottom.

I explained my reason why… because all non-stick surfaces break down, regardless of price. Throw them away after 2-3 years, or go ahead and eat the synthetic crap that comes off of them…

One of my cast iron pans is nearly 100 years old. It’s as seasoned as it’s ever going to get. I defy anyone to fry an egg in that pan without breaking the yoke… It might be possible with enough bacon grease in the bottom, but who wants all that fat and extra calories? Eggs are about the only thing a non-stick surface is really good for. Just don’t get it too hot.
Cast iron is great for almost everything… eggs being one of the almosts.

80% of the reason i bought my dutch oven was to make sauces for pasta. to start as a flavor base i brown pancetta, which cannot be done in an electric machine. sometimes also add sauteed eggplants for pasta alla norma, etc

I explained my reason why… because all non-stick surfaces break down, regardless of price. Throw them away after 2-3 years, or go ahead and eat the synthetic crap that comes off of them…

yeah… thats why you dont buy a non-stick in the first place, and never have to be exposed to eating that synthetic crap..

One of my cast iron pans is nearly 100 years old. It’s as seasoned as it’s ever going to get. I defy anyone to fry an egg in that pan without breaking the yoke…

this is more for Laurel: one does not need an 100 year old pan. my pan took all of 3 uses (from the day it was shipped from factory) for eggs to slip off of it like a wet squid…

Cast iron is great for almost everything… eggs being one of the almosts.

in fact, cast iron is not great for everything, unless that ‘everything’ you cook is all southern/american. want to make indian style dish with tomato base? nope. french and italian stuff involving wine (ie coq au vin?)? pan-reduced sauces? anything delicate? the fact that cast iron (as well as aluminum) is reactive with acids calls for the need of enameling…

Except that you have completely neglected my reason for recommending a slow cooker in the first place… "The working person’s best friend"…
Would you leave your oven on all day, while you’re at work?

Wait… didn’t you just argue in favor of laying out big money for non-stick pans? Why would you pay $60 for something you wouldn’t use "in the first place"?

I gotta tell ya, I seriously doubt your word… if you’ve ever cooked an egg, you would know that eggs stick to cast iron like warm lips to frozen mailboxes!! If you have some magic seasoning skills that the rest of us don’t know about, I’m all ears cowboy!

LOL… technically, you’re right… acid based sauces are not ‘best’ in an iron skillet… however, this convoluted discussion started over the virtues of iron, vs non-stick… are you going to make a sauce, any sauce, in a non-stick skillet? Of course you’re not… and I think you know what I meant, even though you are strangely argumentative for some bizarre reason…

Except that you have completely neglected my reason for recommending a slow cooker in the first place… "The working person’s best friend"…
Would you leave your oven on all day, while you’re at work?

does your slowcooker have a timer? (mine doesnt). in my case, it would be no difference between leaving that on, and leaving a dutch oven on… (ive got a good stove with simmer control)

Wait… didn’t you just argue in favor of laying out big money for non-stick pans? Why would you pay $60 for something you wouldn’t use "in the first place"?

i favor 60$ on a decent regular pan, and NOT buyign any non-stick/teflon coated pan at all

I gotta tell ya, I seriously doubt your word… if you’ve ever cooked an egg, you would know that eggs stick to cast iron like warm lips to frozen mailboxes!! If you have some magic seasoning skills that the rest of us don’t know about, I’m all ears cowboy!

you could pretty much make it not stick to any surface with a decent coating of oil. eggs would stick to a dry cast iron because of all the small pores on the surface… if one is liberal with the seasoning then eggs will slide like roller skates. put some oil on a paper towel and wipe the pan just before doing eggs… (or, of course, just cook it in bacon fat)

I have a cast iron pan that my grandmother’s mother gave her. Before I made the stupid mistake of removing seasoning, it still wouldn’t fry an egg nearly as well as my $15 nonstick pan will. I don’t know if you have some magic ability to season a castiron pan to fry an egg without a huge amount of grease in it, but I’d like to hear about it. Sure, if I fried 1/2 lb of bacon in my pan, then cracked an egg into it, it probably wouldn’t stick, but this negates the reason to have a nonstick, low-fat cooking, which is not possible with cast iron.