Need help: cooking with yogurt

My wife has been preparing me curry dishes. It’s pretty simple. Cook up some boneless skinless chicken breasts, drop in a half can of peas and some thinly sliced potatoes. Then you add in yogurt, the curry spices, and cayenne pepper.

NORMALLY everything works fine. Everything blends together in the yogurt and it comes out delicious.

About 30% of the time, however, the yogurt just breaks apart. You get this watery liquid with tiny white blobs floating in it. It doesn’t taste good at all and we wind up tossing it out.

Does anyone have any idea what this shit is? Is it because the pan is too hot? Is it because we’re using low-fat yogurt? What can we do?
Higher fat yogurt will help prevent curdling as will adding a little bit of flour to the yogurt when it is put into the pan.
If the pan is too hot that’ll do it. Also, canned peas taste like dead. Switch to frozen.
mmm curry. This is a good idea. What kind of yougurt does she use? Greek yogurt like Fage? What brand of curry? I like curry, but always end up with something too sweet.

Well, we use this stuff, only the hot version:

Now, when I make it myself I follow the directions on the label, which call for a tomato based curry. It’s pretty simple. Some olive oil, add the meat (I like beef or lamb), let the meat cook for a bit, add the paste, stir for a few minutes, then add a large can of tomato sauce. After that you just add cayenne pepper to taste and throw in some chopped potatoes if you want and let it simmer for 45 minutes.

That whole process takes an hour or so.

Now my wife, she’s smart. She makes me a curry that tastes just as good and takes 5 minutes of work and then 10 minutes of simmering.

She slices up a potato into thinnish slices and puts them in a frying pan with some pam and a little bit of water. This softens the potatoes. Once they’ve cooked for a few minutes she throws in a small can of peas. Now, while this was going on she was cooking some chicken, the type that is already cooked and frozen (not like you can taste any difference when you’re eating curry), in another frying pan. Once that’s ready she tosses it in with the potatoes and peas. This is then followed by a cup to a cup and a half (rougly one third of a yogurt container), 2 tablespoons of the curry paste, and a whole bunch of cayenne pepper.

Stir it all up, let it simmer, and in 10-15 minutes you have a great tasting curry dish.
Oh, and the flour recommendation worked perfectly. We opened up a fresh can of regular yogurt and tried it. It still curdled. We then put some flour into the yogurt container and stirred it up. Next night we tried again and it didn’t curdle at all. Absolutely perfect.

Thanks
Oh, and for the yogurt we just use regular plain yogurt. You’ll find it at any grocery store. Nothing special.

Oh, and the flour recommendation worked perfectly. We opened up a fresh can of regular yogurt and tried it. It still curdled. We then put some flour into the yogurt container and stirred it up. Next night we tried again and it didn’t curdle at all. Absolutely perfect.

Thanks

make sure you drain any liquid fromt he yogurt container itself

find the yogurt with the least preservatives, added chemicals never respond well to either extreme heat or cold

as the other mentioned use a higher fat yogurt to reduce curtling, the fat absorbed heat and keeps the substance as a whole, and use a low heat

and most importantly CONSTANTLY STIR!! think about it, if you por beaten eggs into a low heat pan, and contantly stir, the eggs wont congeal, but if you let is sit for 30 seconds, youve got scrambled eggs!
while at it.. make something like this

both. Cooking with low-fat varieties always requires tweaking as they are much more water based and therefore the particles break apart quicker.

You can always mix half and half with low-fat and regular varieties. Also cook at a lower heat for more time. Curry shouldn’t be cooked on a high heat anyways it should simmer for as long as you can stand it